Bakers Journal

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Quebec’s wild blueberries arriving soon


July 17, 2012
By Bakers Journal

July 17, 2012, Montreal – Quebec's wild blueberries are expected to be
ready earlier than usual and this summer's harvest promises to be
bountiful.

July 17, 2012, Montreal – Quebec's wild blueberries are expected to be ready earlier than usual and this summer's harvest promises to be bountiful.

Usually available as of early August, the little sweet fruit should make its grand appearance in grocery stores and markets across the province in late July. "Our wild blueberry growers are in for another great season," says Gervais Laprise, director of the Syndicat des producteurs de bleuets du Québec. "While last spring in Saguenay – Lac-St-Jean featured erratic temperatures, the recent rainfalls and sunny periods proved to be a great combination for the little fruit, which has already formed in well-proportioned bunches. This is great news for consumers, who will be able to enjoy the benefits of Quebec's fresh wild blueberries sooner."

Studies have confirmed that, among all small fruits, the wild blueberry offers the greatest antioxidant benefits. Among the many virtues attributed to it is the prevention of various types of cancers and cardiovascular diseases, as well the effects of aging. A single 250-millilitre cup of wild blueberries contains 87 calories, four grams of dietary fibre and the equivalent of 45 per cent of the daily recommended dose of vitamin C.

In order to enjoy blueberries year-round, look for them in the frozen foods section or dry your own blueberries with a paper towel and place them in a freezer bag to preserve their flavour. When you're ready to savour them, just give them a quick wash and you're all set. Check out the Syndicat des producteurs de bleuets du Québec's website, at spbq.ca , for more details on pick-your-own locations and to learn more about Quebec's wild blueberry industry, health benefits, recipes, addresses, as well as maps of forest picking sites.

Wild blueberries are Canada's most grown fruit, taking up over half of the country's fruit-growing land. They are exported to more than 30 countries, including the United States, Japan and Germany.