Craft beer as a drink is obvious; however that same beverage as a fantastic ingredient for both sweet and savoury baking is growing in popularity. Craft beers are diverse and complex with flavours that range from malt and barley to dried fruits and citrus.
Over the past few years, we have seen that even with consumers making better-for-you food and beverage choices, they are not ready to give up on dessert. Individual, minis, thins and clusters continue to be offered from artisan bake shops and large commercial companies for people to enjoy the indulgence while still maintaining a healthy dietary pattern.
New York – Grano arso, translated literally as “burnt grain,” has become prized by top chefs for the earthy, toasty ­flavour it gives pasta, bread and pizza. Bloomberg News reports. | READ MORE
Copenhagen, Denmark – A Danish study is exploring the potential of honeybee brood – honeybee eggs, larvae and pupae – as a staple food and source of protein.
Upper Kingsclear, N.B. – A new study suggests consuming a flavonoid-rich wild blueberry beverage may enhance the mental skills that help children manage time, pay attention and get things done.
Vevey, Switzerland – There is significant confusion among consumers about how much whole grain should be consumed daily, and some of that comes from a lack of knowledge about which foods contain whole grain, says a new U.K. study.
Oslo, Norway, and Melbourne, Australia – An international team of researchers has found that the familiar bloating many people experience after eating foods containing wheat may be due to sensitivity to fructan, not gluten, as is commonly believed. Their paper is published in the journal Gastroenterology. Medical Xpress reports.READ MORE
As part of a general shift towards clean labels and natural ingredients, honey, nature’s sweet syrup, has caught the attention of the baking industry. Honey history is rich and deep. For years, honey has been used topically as an antiseptic. It’s believed to speed up the healing process in mild, superficial wounds, ulcers and burns. It’s hygroscopic, so it draws moisture out of environment and dehydrates bacteria.  It also has a high viscosity which creates a protective barrier that can promote wound healing.
One of the top trends at Bakery Congress was investing in research and development to create innovations to meet consumer demands for traditional-style bread and baked goods with modern conveniences, including extended freshness and moistness and improved taste, appearance and nutrition.
Acrylamide is a naturally occurring compound that forms in certain foods, including breads, cakes, cookies, potatoes, crackers, cereals and snacks that are baked, fried or toasted. Boiling and steaming foods do not typically form acrylamide.
According to Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, between 2008 and 2012, the gluten-free market had a compound annual growth rate of more than 26 per cent and the global market is expected to hit US$6.2 billion by 2018.
Increased interest in food from mission-based companies, emerging millennial values and a desire to be part of a food tribe are all factors fuelling the growth of vegan foods, reports Elizabeth Carford in a March 2015 Food Navigator USA article entitled, “Vegan is going mainstream, trend data suggest.” Carford cites Eric Pierce, director of strategy and insights with New Hope Natural Media, who says, “The reason for the expansion appears to be the mitigation of the perception of vegan beyond its traditional stereotype of being all about animal welfare.”
Consumer interest in digestive health continues to grow and is one of the top health trends this year. Consequently, gut health was a popular topic at the American Society for Nutrition Scientific Sessions at the Experimental Biology 2016 conference in San Diego in April.
The popularity of free-from foods has surged in the Canadian marketplace over the past decade. Where consumers once had to thoroughly read ingredients lists on packaged food, there are now entire grocery aisles dedicated to gluten-free, dairy-free, and other allergen-free food. According to a 2011 Euromonitor report, the Canadian food intolerance market is globally ranked 10th at a value of $161.3 million US. The U.S. has the largest market at $3.4 billion US.
According to a CNN report, a food scientist in Singapore has extracted anthocyanins from black rice and infused it into bread, developing a purple-coloured loaf that digests 20 per cent slower than regular white bread and includes healthy antioxidants. | Read more.
Did you know that nine out of every 10 bites of food we eat today start with a seed? Seeds are important in our food ecosystem and are packed with essential nutrients like protein, fibre, vitamins, minerals and essential fatty acids. And suddenly, seeds are everywhere – in beverages, bars, crackers, breads, cereals, yogurt – you name it. In my book, The Need for Seeds, available via Amazon, I address how to make seeds an everyday food for your healthy diet, based on the platform of adding more plant-based foods and ingredients to your meals and snacks.
When it comes to bakery trends, numbers can speak volumes. The Baking Association of Canada’s (BAC) Ontario chapter recently presented a data focused seminar on some of the big health trends of today. The event took place on Jan. 26 at Centennial College in Scarborough, Ont.
Paul Hetherington, president of the Baking Association of Canada, brought up some chewy food for thought at a recent Ontario chapter event. Isn’t it strange, he mused in broaching the subject of genetic modification, how people seem to love technology in their communications, clothes, toys, and cars, but are far more questioning of its role in their food.
Alberta - Nutrition and food science students at the University of Alberta have invented a healthy, dairy-free 'gelato' made entirely from pulse ingredients, reports HuffPost Alberta. |READ MORE
Singapore - A team of food scientists from the National University of Singapore (NUS) have created a recipe for making healthier, more diabetic-friendly bread by adding a natural plant pigment called anthocyanin, which is extracted from black rice. Nutrition Insight reports. |READ MORE
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