Profiles
The bakeries on this year’s ‘Who’s Who’ list, as in any other year, demonstrate innovation and excellence – a willingness to do things differently and go the extra mile. However, our choices for 2009 are perhaps more varied than ever before.
COBOURG, Ont. – Some people believe we make our own luck, usually through hard work. If that were the case with Millstone Bread, it’s easy to see how this humble artisan bakery would succeed on its own steam.
Satin Ice fondant demo featuring Julie Bashore.
If you blink, you’ll miss it. However, if you have your windows rolled down and you’re moving slow enough, you’re sure to pick up the wonderful aroma coming from a small bakery in Goodwood, Ont.
Born in Ethiopia to Armenian parents and now firmly established in Montreal, the husband-and-wife team of Rita and Levon Djerrahian have starkly contrasting skill sets yet are perfectly matched as producers of some of the highest-quality cakes in Canada.
Baker Street – not only a great song by U.K. rocker Gerry Rafferty, but also a great name for a bakery.
As an allergen, nuts might not be as prevalent as wheat flour and gluten, but the consequences of ignoring them can be much more dangerous – even fatal. With schools removing food products containing nuts from their menus, bakeries and other food manufacturers are under pressure to comply with strict safety, sanitation and ingredient traceability rules, such as those set out in the Hazard Analysis Critical Control Path (HACCP) program.
Admittedly, adult cakes are an acquired taste. Some are very elegantly crafted to look more like finely sculpted art pieces than XXX eye-poppers, while others are meant to be provocative and shocking.
Lynn Ogryzlo’s culinary passion has led her on a bountiful journey as Niagara’s homegrown champion of food and wine. For the past two decades this petite culinary activist has transformed her love affair with food into a career as a much-sought-after speaker, writer and key player in the food and tourism industry, and she takes pride in advocating, educating and promoting culinary traditions and innovation.
The next great miniature dessert trend could very well have you saying “whoopie!”. Created by the Amish community in Pennsylvania, the story goes that when an Amish man found one of these treats in his lunch he would gleefully exclaim, “whoopie!”
Organic Works Bakery is both carving and expanding a niche. Although it started out as a wholesale supplier, it’s fast becoming a destination shopping experience in downtown London, Ont.
Food is one of those rare areas where lifetime passions can be born in early childhood. Such is definitely the case for Anna Olson, co-owner and co-founder of Olson Foods and Bakery in St. Catharines, Ont.
When our culture observes successful entrepreneurs, we tend to say they have the “Midas touch.” In other words, their success is a gift from on high and these people are simply born to succeed – and we mere mortals need not apply.
When the Canadian Pastry Chefs Guild gathered for their November meeting at Montgomery’s Inn in Etobicoke, they got a taste of what bread making was like more than 175 years ago.
On the subject of destiny, Douglas Adams once wrote “I seldom end up where I wanted to go, but almost always end up where I need to be.”
In October, European Breads Bakery in Vancouver became one of the first Canadian bakeries to start selling its breads in biodegradable bags. This bold and groundbreaking move will prevent approximately 200,000 plastic bags from potentially hitting the landfills each year.
Andrea Damon Gibson is the president of Fred’s Bread in North York, Ont. In this Q & A with former Bakers Journal editor Jane Ayer, she discusses her experiences with sourdough bread, a subject featured in depth on pages 34-37 of this month’s Bakers Journal.
And to think he almost went into the orthopedic shoe industry. Marty Curtis could probably use a pair with the amount of running around he’s been doing of late.
Is your bakery an “easy shop”? Are customers able to come in the front door and know exactly where to look to find what they’re after? Does your signage entice folks to buy more, buy now and buy often? Merchandising is part art and part science, and one of the biggest mistakes we can make as retailers is arranging our stores according to our business needs rather than our customers’ needs.
Change can, initially at least, be a little bit scary. I suspect most of us remember great moments of upheaval in our lives with a mix of emotions: exhilaration, fear, uncertainty, excitement.

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