Profiles
Sven Becker was a molecular biologist before taking over Andy's German Bakehaus. The Vancouver Sun shares the story of how he went from science to sweets. |READ MORE
What would happen if you fused together a traditional Asian and European bakery? If you took the look of a French bread, but gave it the softness of an Asian bun? If you set-up the artistic feel of a European bakery, but operated it in the self-serve style of an Asian one? Or took a French baguette and dressed it with fish roe and wasabi?
Roy Bouman was just “putting the wheels” on his new bread slicer when he answered my telephone call on a sunny day at home in Vernon, B.C. His tone was buoyant, and why wouldn’t it be? Twenty years ago, with three young sons depending on him, Bouman and his wife Caroline took a leap of faith to open a bakery, and now they have a hoppin’ livelihood to show for it. Before I digress into the generations of Bouman bakers that preceded this particular one’s life at the helm of Sweet Caroline’s, let’s give due pause to say: Happy 20th Birthday! Twenty years in the competitive baking industry is an accomplishment indeed.
After years of coming close, the Canadian baking team has finally snagged the Louis Lesaffre Cup. The team is having its best year yet, and members want to maintain that momentum until they are named the world’s best.
There’s no question Bryn Rawlyk had his hands full when The Night Oven Bakery opened for business. In addition to managing day-to-day operations at Saskatoon’s newest production bakery, Rawlyk was also faced with the challenge of perfecting processes to keep his operation stocked with wood-fired breads made from flour milled in-house.
Burnaby, BC - The Valley Bakery has been inducted into the Burnaby Business Hall of Fame. Burnaby Now reports. |READ MORE
Quebec City – While the concept may sound crazy to some, cat cafés are big in Asia, growing in popularity in Europe and the U.S., and are now purring their way across Canada. CBC News reports. | READ MORE
Stockholm – This summer Swedish bakery RC Chocolat launched a 24-hour hotel for sourdoughs, where anyone can store their sourdough while on vacation. Munchies reports. | READ MORE
Freetown, P.E.I. – A Prince Edward Island baker is on a roll with a new business that brings her goods to her customers and uses local produce. CBC News reports. | READ MORE
Join us on an end-of-summer road trip without leaving your bakery. Stops include a ship’s chandlery and fish processing plant on Nova Scotia’s south shore that houses a charming café and sells breads and other goods wholesale, an Etobicoke, Ont., that celebrates the humble butter tart by offering many varieties – all with gluten-free counterparts – and a bakery in Red Deer, Alta., where longtime staff make a staggering 155 dozen cupcakes on Valentine’s Day.
Windsor, Ont. – Self-taught baker Michelle Bowman recently opened The Little White Kitchen Baking Co., in Windsor, Ont., with some help from the owner of food-critic darling Blackbird Baking Co. in Toronto. | CBC News reports. | READ MORE
Buddy Valastro needs no introduction. But just in case you’ve been living under that proverbial rock, the 38-year-old founder and star of the hit reality series Cake Boss, now in its seventh season, runs Carlo’s Bake Shop in Hoboken, N.J., along with his siblings.
When Dennis Evans worked in his father Frank’s business, Smith’s Bakery and Café, on Agricola Street in Halifax, N.S., for 10 years, not once did he think he’d eventually run the show. But that’s what happened just over a year ago when Dennis and his wife, Tara Fleming, negotiated with Frank and his wife, Carolyn, to take over the bakery. Frank and Carolyn were ready to retire but wanted to keep the bakery in the family.
A famous quote by Irish playwright Samuel Beckett goes like this: “Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try again. Fail again. Fail better.”
With shows like Cake Boss leading the way, the art of crafting ever-more-elaborate cakes has captured the public’s attention.
Never in the history of food production has a person with allergies had more high-quality foods to choose from. Although only a few years ago, products suffered from poor taste, they’ve never tasted better, they’ve never been available so widely and they’ve never been more sophisticated.
When Nina Notaro, owner of Winnipeg’s Cake Studio, laid eyes on her most challenging wedding cake, she got a bit teary-eyed in a happy way. It was delivered to the venue in three sections and, when assembled, measured over five feet, three inches tall.
Baking Team Canada continues to train hard for the Americas qualifying round of the Louis Lesaffre Cup, May 30-June 6 in Buenos Aires, Argentina, according to the latest update from team captain Alan Dumonceaux.
Bonjour Bakery in Edmonton is the winner of Bakers Journal’s 2014 Business Innovation Award. The bakery is owned and operated by Yvan Chartrand, 54, and as the winner, he receives a $500 prize and a plaque to hang in his bakery. Jelly Modern Doughnuts, with locations in Toronto and Calgary, is our runner-up. More on them below.Chartrand runs Bonjour Bakery with help from his wife, Ritsuko; their 28-year-old son, Kenny; and two part-time employees. They purchased the business, then known as Tree Stone Bakery, in 2010 (although they have temporarily retained the Tree Stone name and brand while they give the building a makeover), taking over from longtime owner/operator Nancy Rubuliak, who ran the bakery for more than a decade.Prior to establishing Bonjour Bakery, Chartrand owned and operated two bakeries in Sapporo, Japan, where he met his wife. “The Japanese make excellent bread,” he recalls. “They are so organized. They go and study the process in France and keep it exactly the same.“We were one of the first bakeries to introduce bagels in Japan and customers there called them hard doughnuts. We had to teach them how to eat bagels,” he recalls with a laugh.The Chartrand family produces a fairly traditional lineup of breads, bagels, baguettes, brioches and croissants, but their production and marketing are far from being stuck in the past. For example, thanks to the acquisition of some new Italian-made equipment, such as a hydraulic divider, Yvan, Ritsuko and Kenny are able to start later in the day while making the same quality of baked goods.One of the biggest challenges of staffing a bakery, Chartrand says, “is finding someone who wants to work from 2 to 8 in the morning. By doing these changes in processes and technology, between the three of us we have doubled the level of production that was here before.”Hiring help has also become difficult thanks to Alberta’s oil boom. Rubuliak struggled to find journeyman bakers and as a result had trouble meeting demand. But so far, the Chartrands have managed to keep up. They’ve even successfully moved into the wholesale market, supplying restaurants and cafes, while retaining the look, feel and yes, smell, of a small local bread shop.“We are constantly introducing new products. We are traditional but we make all kinds of new doughs. We look at what customers are asking for and go from there.”Some of Chartrand’s recent innovations include a traditional sourdough bread made with barley and brown rice, as well as purple wheat bread. “Here in Alberta we one of the only bakeries that make the purple wheat bread,” says Chartrand. “It’s mainly made in Saskatchewan but as far as artisan bakeries go, we are the only ones doing that.”Upon purchasing the business, Chartrand made major upgrades to the bakery equipment and more than doubled product output and revenues—while staying true to his vision of making European-style bread.“That’s one of the biggest problems for bakeries like us—trying to get bigger and more profitable,” he says. “We have done it by changing production techniques. Even though we are traditional, we are using the latest technology.”That technology includes a hydraulic dough divider imported from Italy that has allowed Chartrand to drastically cut the amount of labour time needed to produce bread.“It doesn’t change the quality but it changes your timing,” he says. “We still do some loaves by hand but many we’ve put in the new machines. Everything is in a controlled chamber, with a controlled temperature. So instead of starting at 2 in the morning we start at 5 or 6 so it’s a lot easier on staff.”Some of Chartrand’s most innovative work, however, has been done not in the backroom but on the business plan. He came up with a strategy to find new sources of revenue and has executed it with great success, growing the bakery’s annual sales to restaurants from $10,000 to $100,000.“We are more profitable wholesale than retail,” he says. “That’s where I think small bakeries are missing some opportunities. But we would not have been able to do that without upgrading our processes. That’s a trend small bakeries in North America can adopt. The big guys can’t produce the high-end bread that nice restaurants and cafes want. For us, that’s been really important. And financially it’s been a big help: I was able to pay off my loans a year and half early.” Another new avenue for growth at Bonjour Bakery has been the addition of gourmet meats and cheeses. Chartrand has devoted part of his counter space to fine cheeses and is in the process of installing a room for prepared and fermented meats, such as charcuterie. It’s a trend Chartrand has seen taking hold in Quebec and he intends to bring it to Edmonton. “So instead of going to a specialty meat or cheese shop, they can get it here” with their baguette, he says. “That way, I can raise the sale by $5-$6 per customer. That’s a huge difference—cheese and meat are very profitable, which really helps the bottom line. And there’s not much additional labour involved.”What’s remarkable about Bonjour Bakery is how Chartrand has innovated so much without losing sight of his core mission, which is to serve the community as a small, neighbourhood bakery. Even more impressively, he also aspires to serve his fellow bakers. Of particular concern to him is the workload—and by extension, stress—bakers put upon themselves because they don’t stop to examine how they are running their bakeries.“I want to help other bakers and other bakeries. I’ve been baking for 20-odd years; I’ve had businesses overseas, and so small bakeries here in Edmonton will come and see me to talk about processes. I want to see them succeed with a good quality of life. You have to be passionate, of course, but your passion can put you in the hospital. It makes no sense to get sick, get divorced, over a business. I would be happy to be recognized as someone who wants to help small bakeries see each other as partners instead of competitors. In business, whenever you become arrogant, that’s when it starts to go downhill. Why do you want to be in business to make enemies? Life is short, so you might as well be friendly with everybody.”And although the business has grown quite a bit during the five years Chartrand and his family have owned and operated it, they’ve been careful to maintain ties to the customer base. “My wife just came back from three weeks in Japan and customers are hugging her and saying welcome back,” he says. “That personal touch is often missing here in North American bakeries.”
Dec. 31, 2014, Hamilton, Ont. -- Nicola Cino has been behind the Italian treats at Frank's Sicilia Bakery for 50 years. He bakes everything from scratch and three generations of Hamiltonians have celebrated with his creations. | READ MORE

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