Nutrition
Increased interest in food from mission-based companies, emerging millennial values and a desire to be part of a food tribe are all factors fuelling the growth of vegan foods, reports Elizabeth Carford in a March 2015 Food Navigator USA article entitled, “Vegan is going mainstream, trend data suggest.” Carford cites Eric Pierce, director of strategy and insights with New Hope Natural Media, who says, “The reason for the expansion appears to be the mitigation of the perception of vegan beyond its traditional stereotype of being all about animal welfare.”
Consumer interest in digestive health continues to grow and is one of the top health trends this year. Consequently, gut health was a popular topic at the American Society for Nutrition Scientific Sessions at the Experimental Biology 2016 conference in San Diego in April.
The popularity of free-from foods has surged in the Canadian marketplace over the past decade. Where consumers once had to thoroughly read ingredients lists on packaged food, there are now entire grocery aisles dedicated to gluten-free, dairy-free, and other allergen-free food. According to a 2011 Euromonitor report, the Canadian food intolerance market is globally ranked 10th at a value of $161.3 million US. The U.S. has the largest market at $3.4 billion US.
According to a CNN report, a food scientist in Singapore has extracted anthocyanins from black rice and infused it into bread, developing a purple-coloured loaf that digests 20 per cent slower than regular white bread and includes healthy antioxidants. | Read more.
Did you know that nine out of every 10 bites of food we eat today start with a seed? Seeds are important in our food ecosystem and are packed with essential nutrients like protein, fibre, vitamins, minerals and essential fatty acids. And suddenly, seeds are everywhere – in beverages, bars, crackers, breads, cereals, yogurt – you name it. In my book, The Need for Seeds, available via Amazon, I address how to make seeds an everyday food for your healthy diet, based on the platform of adding more plant-based foods and ingredients to your meals and snacks.
When it comes to bakery trends, numbers can speak volumes. The Baking Association of Canada’s (BAC) Ontario chapter recently presented a data focused seminar on some of the big health trends of today. The event took place on Jan. 26 at Centennial College in Scarborough, Ont.
Paul Hetherington, president of the Baking Association of Canada, brought up some chewy food for thought at a recent Ontario chapter event. Isn’t it strange, he mused in broaching the subject of genetic modification, how people seem to love technology in their communications, clothes, toys, and cars, but are far more questioning of its role in their food.
Alberta - Nutrition and food science students at the University of Alberta have invented a healthy, dairy-free 'gelato' made entirely from pulse ingredients, reports HuffPost Alberta. |READ MORE
Singapore - A team of food scientists from the National University of Singapore (NUS) have created a recipe for making healthier, more diabetic-friendly bread by adding a natural plant pigment called anthocyanin, which is extracted from black rice. Nutrition Insight reports. |READ MORE
It’s the International Year of Pulses. Now is the time to learn how to bake with this nutritious group of foods.
Almond flour is a nutritious and versatile option for your baked goods.
It seems the public has been busy tallying up a list of food fears. A recent survey of Americans, conducted by the International Food Information Council Foundation, suggested that chemicals in food outranked foodborne illness as concern. And people die from food poisoning. People also die from having no food. Are priorities becoming misplaced?
Maryland – Data published by market research firm Packaged Facts in the report Food Formulation Trends: Ancient Grains and Sprouted Ingredients indicates that 19 per cent of American adults have purchased menu or grocery items featuring ancient grains in the past 30 days.
Hamilton, Ont. – The science surrounding a low-fat diet has changed but our attitudes haven't kept up, a registered dietitian and McMaster University professor says. CBC News reports. | READ MORE
June 23, 2015, Saskatoon, Sask. -- Go ahead — bite down on that bagel. A University of Saskatchewan professor says he's debunked claims that modern varieties of wheat are causing gluten intolerance because of how their protein content has been manipulated. | READ MORE
Surprisingly versatile, dates are a great way to reduce sugar in many recipes.
F ood legislation is a science-based discipline. Every proposed new food regulation – whether it’s as minuscule as an extended use of a previously approved food additive, or as wide-sweeping as the regulatory review of a genetically modified food crop – is evaluated on its scientific merit.
Feb. 3, 2015, London, United Kingdom -- Dietary sugars intakes are decreasing or stable in most countries, according to a data review of 10 European countries, Australia, New Zealand and the United States. | READ MORE
Dec. 15, 2014, London, United Kingdom -- The weight wellness market is at a tipping point, and in 2015 big name brands like Weight Watchers will continue to see sales plunge – even Special K, the world’s biggest food for weight management, has experienced a sudden 10 per cent drop in sales.
Oct. 28, 2014, Ottawa – Governments should either restrict the sale of high-calorie, nutrient-poor foods or increase taxes on such foods to combat obesity, according to an editorial published online in the Canadian Medical Association Journal. Mediscape reports. | READ MORE
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